TU BBS 1st Year MGT201 Business English Syllabus and Model Questions


TU Bachelors of Business Study (BBS) 1st Year MGT201 Business English Syllabus, Course of Study and Model Questions

Course No.: MGT 201
Nature of the Course: Compulsory
Full Marks: 100
Pass Marks: 35
Lecture hours: 150

Course Objectives

The BBS English course is a two-pronged English course emphasizing the core areas of reading and writing along with a strong communication component. It is designed to help students get ahead fast with their general English skills in interdisciplinary contexts with the lessons covering important vocabulary, grammar, reading and writing, listening and speaking skills for general and technical English. It is a theme-based course with comprehensive coverage of English language and critical thinking skills. Authentic listening and reading materials provide models for up to date language, grammar, and vocabulary.

The course has the following four main components: i) Interdisciplinary Approach to Learning English ii) Functional English Language Texts iii) Reading for Writing iv) Style

General Objectives

The general objectives of the course are to

  • develop specific skills in core English
  • tech the writing modes
  • discuss rhetorical devices
  • present language points required for academic success
  • support serious reading and writing activities
  • understand and produce paragraphs, essays, letters, and report
  • build students’ confidence in using English in professional and social scenarios · develop critical skills and cultural awareness

Specific Objectives

The specific course objectives are to teach students to: · work on writing, reading and listening skills

  • use correct punctuation, spelling and vocabulary
  • increase confidence and fluency in speaking
  • improve accuracy to enable clear communication of ideas
  • develop understanding of grammar
  • interact in a multi-cultural and interdisciplinary environment
  • focus on student’s personal needs and objectives
  • acquire a wide interdisciplinary knowledge of different disciplines
  • use thought-provoking readings to develop writing skills
  • give students tools to write both personal and academic essays
  • help students write in multiple modes
  • encourage thinking and reflection as a prelude to writing
  • expand students’ knowledge of grammar
  • introduce students to the key areas in the study of style
  • give suggestions for project work

 Course Contents

Unit 1: Interdisciplinary Approach to Learning English (Weightage 40%) 

This component of the course carries carry 40 marks.

  • Invitation
  • Interactions (relating to the text) and Spotlights
  • Ancient Tales
  • Yudhisthira’s Wisdom (Rao); The Brave Little Parrot (Martin); If Not Higher (Peretz);
  • Interactions (relating to the selected texts) and Spotlights
  • Education
  • Why go to a University? (Nissani); Don’t Cut Down the Trees, Brother Woodcutter (Sama); Surely You Are Joking, Mr. Feynman (Feynman); A 1996 Commencement Speech (Rushdie);
  • Interactions (relating to the selected texts) and Spotlights
  • Actions and Consequences
  • The Parrot in the Cage (Paudyal); A Sound of Thunder (Bradbury);
  • No Smoke from the Chimneys (Shrestha);
  • Interactions (relating to the selected texts) and Spotlights
  • Television
  • The Wretched Stone (Van Allsburg); TV Can be a Good Parent (Gore);
  • Interactions (relating to the selected texts) and Spotlights
  • Crosscultural Bridges
  • Marriage is a Private Affair (Achebe); Then and Now: Finding My Voice (Kim);
  • Interactions (relating to the selected texts) and Spotlights
  • Cultural Anthropology
  • Arranging a Marriage in India (Nanda); Life is Sweet at Kumansenu (Nicol);
  • Interactions (relating to the selected texts) and Spotlights
  • The Human Condition
  • The Lunatic (Devkota); How Sane Are We? (Chaudhary); Gaia (Lohani)
  • Interactions (relating to the selected texts) and Spotlights
  • Natural Science
  • The Making of a Scientist (Ramchandran); Scientific Inquiry: Invention and Test (Hempel);
  • Interactions (relating to the selected texts) and Spotlights
  • Humor and Satire
  • King John and the Abbot of Canterbury (Anon); Third Thoughts (Lucas) ; The Clock Tower (Sherchan);
  • Interactions (relating to the selected texts) and Spotlights
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • The Stub Book (de Alarcon); Mr. Know-All (Maugham); Keeping
  • Errors at Bay (Russell); What Is Intelligence, Anyway (Asimov);
  • Interactions (relating to the selected texts) and Spotlights
  • Love
  • To His Coy Mistress (Marvell); The Telegram on the Table (Pradhan); Piano (Lawrence);
  • Interactions (relating to the selected texts) and Spotlights
  • Life and Death
  • The Great Answer (Oursler); Stopping by Woods on a Snowy
  • Evening (Frost); A Tale (Koirala); Ethics (Pastan); “Where the Mind is without Fear’ (Tagore); New Year (Parijat);
  • Interactions (relating to the selected texts) and Spotlights

Prescribed Book

Nissani, M., and S. Lohani. Flax-Golden Tales: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Learning English. Shorter Edition. Kathmandu: Ekta, 2013. (Sounds of English and Stories and Poems on CD).

Unit 2: Functional English Language Texts (Weightage 15%)     

This component of the course carries carry 15 marks.

  • Paragraph to Short Essay
  • Descriptive Essays
  • Narrative Essays
  • Opinion Essays
  • Comparison and Contrast Essays
  • Cause and Effect Essays

Prescribed Book

Savage, Alice, and Patricia Mayer. Effective Academic Writing 2: The Short Essay. Essay. Oxford: OUP 2005.

Unit 3: Reading for Writing (Weightage 30%)                  

This component of the course carries carry 40 marks.

  • Introduction to the Topic, Reading, and Discussion
  • Reflection
  • Discussion
  • Preparing to read
  • Reading for overall meaning
  • Reading for more detail
  • Personal Written Response
  • Journals: a private audience
  • Shared writing
  • Feedback on student writing
  • Further Reading, Writing, and Discussion
  • Preparing to read
  • Reading for overall meaning
  • Reading for more detail
  • Helping each other understand
  • Discussion: Critical thinking
  • Focus on Writing Skills
  • Using other’s writing
  • Meeting reader expectations
  • Sentence grammar
  • Formal on Writing Skills
  • Writing topics
  • Generating ideas
  • Expanding student point of view
  • Initial drafts
  • Review, revision, and assessment
  • Grammar and Punctuation
  • Sentence Structure
  • Relative Clauses
  • Word Order
  • Adjectives and Adverbs
  • Punctuation

Complete Essay Assessment Checklist

Prescribed Book

Smalzer, William R. Write to be Read: Reading, Reflection, and Writing. Second Edition. Cambridge: CUP, 2005.

Unit 4: Style (Weightage 15%)                

This component of the course carries carry 15 marks.

  • Choosing le most juste
  • Following and flouting conventions
  • Live and dead metaphors
  • Patterns of words in a text
  • Patterns of grammar in a text
  • The textual orchestration of patterns
  • The effects of the medium
  • Sequences of words and events
  • The selection of significant detail
  • Personal attitude, involvement and emotion
  • Style and ideology
  • A note on the poetic
  • Suggestions for projects

Prescribed Book

Haynes, John. Style. London and New York: Routledge, 1995.

Teaching Methods

The suggested teaching method is to introduce the theme and the writing task and then guide the students to practice specific skills and put language knowledge to produce their own writings. The recommended approach is to view the books not as mere language texts but to introduce students to many disciplines, to expand their intellectual and spiritual horizons, to underscore the nobility of humanity’s never-ending search for truth, beauty, and compassion. The goal is, therefore, to teach language skills along with insight and wisdom. The specific methods are also suggested in the course books and teacher manuals, and it will prove valuable for teachers to follow them. A useful method will be to introduce the theme and the writing task and then guide the student to practice specific skills and put language knowledge to produce their own writings in different genres using appropriate styles.

Evaluation

The examinations will cover the language skills and include a range of tasks which assess students’ ability to use English in a variety of contexts. Above all, he examinations will assess the students’ ability to communicate effectively in English, especially in reading and writing activities using appropriate writing style.  

 Suggested Books

Carter, Ronald, and Michael McCarthy. Cambridge Grammar of English. Cambridge: CUP, 2006.

Crystal, David, ed. The Penguin Encyclopedia. 3rd rev. ed. Penguin Books, 2006.

Effective Academic Writing 2: The Short Essay. Answer Key Booklet. Oxford: OUP, 2006.

Oxford Advanced Learner’s. Dictionary of Current English. Eighth Edition. Oxford: OUP, 2010.

Smalzer, William R. Write to be Read: Teacher’s Manual. Second Edition. Cambridge: CUP, 1996.

Thomson, Anne, Critical Reasoning: A Practical Introduction. Third Edition. London and New York: Routledge, 2009.

Thomson, Anne. Critical Reasoning: A Practical Introduction. Third Edition. London and New York: Routledge: 2009.

Model Question of BBS First Year- MGT202 Business English

MGT 201: Business English

BBS 1st Year

Evaluation Model

Course Description

The BBS English course is a two-pronged English course emphasizing the core areas of reading and writing along with a strong communication component. It is designed to help students get ahead fast with their general English skills in interdisciplinary contexts with the lessons covering important vocabulary, grammar, reading and writing, listening and speaking skills for general and technical  English. It is a theme-based course with comprehensive coverage of English language and critical thinking skills. Authentic listening and reading materials provide models for up to date language, grammar and vocabulary.

The course has the following four main components: i) Interdisciplinary approach to Learning English ii) Functional English Language Texts iii) Reading for Writing iv) Style

Prescribed Books

Nissani, M., and S. Lohani. Flax-Golden Tales: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Learning English. Shorter Edition. Kathmandu: Ekta, 2013. (Sounds of English and Stories and Poems on CD).

Savage, Alice, and Patricia Mayer. Effective Academic Writing 2: The Short Essay. Second Edition. Oxford: OUP, 2012.

Smalzer, William R. Write to be Read: Reading: Reading, Reflection, and Writing. Second Edition. Cambridge: CUP, 2005.

Haynes, John. Style. London and New York: Routledge, 1995.

Evaluation v Questions will be set covering all the prescribed books.

  • The questions will be of three broad types.
    • Comprehensive/Analytical type: 2 questions each of 15 marks (3 questions will be given): 2 x 15 = 30 marks
    • Descriptive/Short answer type: 5 questions each of 10 marks (6 questions will be given): 5 x 10 = 50 marks
    • Brief/Objective type: 10 questions each of 2 marks (12 questions will be given):

2 x 10 = 20 marks v The distribution of questions will be as follows: 1) Comprehensive / Analytical type:

  • one question from Flax-Golden
  • one question from Write to be Read
  • one question from Flax-Golden and / or Write to be Read
  • Descriptive/Short answer type
  • one question from Flax-Golden
  • one question from Write to be Read
  • two questions from Short Essay
  • two questions from Style
  • Brief/Objective type:
  • two questions from Flax-Golden
  • two questions from Write to be Read
  • two questions from Short Essay
  • four questions from Style
  • Students will be tested on their ability to:
  • to apply the four levels of reading a text
  • to write convincing paragraphs and essays
  • to discover and communicate meaning holistically
  • to write a variety of functional text types with a rhetorical focus matching content with style
  • to show an understanding of grammar and vocabulary in context

A model question paper is given below, but it is to be borne in mind that it is just for giving a general idea of an exam paper and is not and does not aim to be exhaustive. It is just one of the many kinds of question papers that may be framed.

Click Here: To download and read full syllabus and course of study of Tribhuvan University- TU Bachelors of Business Studies- BBS Program

See also:

TU BBS 1st Year MGT202 Business Statistics Syllabus and Model Questions

TU BBS 1st Year MGT213 Principles of Management Syllabus and Model Questions

TU BBS 1st Year MGT211 Accounting for Financial Analysis & Planning Syllabus and Model Questions

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